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Letters to the editor

Read letters to the editor submitted by Local Xpress readers.

We may edit letters for brevity — they generally will run 200 words or less. 

Letters become the property of the Local Xpress and may be republished in any format. 

All letters to the editor must have the author's name, address and a contact phone number in order to be considered for publication. 

Your name and the name of your community will be published with the letter.

To submit a letter for consideration, please email it to Opinions@localxpress.ca with Letter to the Editor in the subject line.

OPINION: Wanted -- Liberal heroes who will stand up for teachers

OPINION: Wanted -- Liberal heroes who will stand up for teachers

My son’s teacher is the kind of person I desperately needed when I was five years old. She truly knows my son, values his spirit, and has already taught him so many things. We had our first parent-teacher meeting last week ... there was no question that she had taken the time to get to know him, despite all of the challenges she is faced with every day in her classroom.
Education system stuck in mire instead of setting bar higher

Education system stuck in mire instead of setting bar higher

It's time to tell the truth: the education system is failing kids by asking too little of them or telling them they have a learning challenge, but not doing any more to help them than the Charter of Rights and Freedoms requires.
Imposed contract will only freeze fracture between teachers, province

Imposed contract will only freeze fracture between teachers, province

The government is right that some, perhaps most, of the issues teachers now insist be included in a contract would be better handled in some more consultative, collegial way. Teachers, unfortunately, no longer trust the government to perform its role in such a process in good faith. Any lawyer can tell you that the longer the contract text, the less the parties trust each other.
By shutting out students, Stephen McNeil proves teachers' point: they lack adequate resources

By shutting out students, Stephen McNeil proves teachers' point: they lack adequate resources

Premier Stephen McNeil has demonstrated that he has no clue when it comes to negotiating. He’s made the collective bargaining process all about him, instead of the issues.
OPINION: Here's why the education system is breaking down

OPINION: Here's why the education system is breaking down

A number of policy changes over the last 15 to 20 years, compounding each other, have created the perfect storm in education and in our classrooms today.
TEACHER'S LETTER: We have so much work that we can't work to rule

TEACHER'S LETTER: We have so much work that we can't work to rule

In the staff room last week, I heard teachers who were concerned and worried; they had no idea how they could possibly work to rule. Many expressed that they would just have to work from home if they were not allowed to be in school earlier than 20 minutes before class.
A slap in the face to teachers who go the extra mile

A slap in the face to teachers who go the extra mile

Teachers and administration at Bicentennial School in Dartmouth have worked tirelessly for decades to engage a disenfranchised community to build trust and two-way communication for the benefit of children who might otherwise be written off.  Isn't it time that government, their employer, fully acknowledge and give credit to these front-line workers who are doing their damnedest to help kids succeed when just about every social obstacle is in place to prevent that? 
OPEN LETTER: School system hangs by a thread -- the devotion of teachers

OPEN LETTER: School system hangs by a thread -- the devotion of teachers

I have to confess that I was shocked to learn that the government has felt comfortable leaving the safety of our children up to the kindness of teachers and principals. In all these years, it never once occurred to me that when the teachers and principals arrived earlier than 20 minutes before class that they were not being paid for their time.
With new schools, McNeil, Casey queue-jumping for political gain

With new schools, McNeil, Casey queue-jumping for political gain

It was the executive council (cabinet) that approved new schools for Bridgetown and Tatamagouche, auditor general Michael Pickup found, as it has the final call on capital projects. Who leads the executive council? Stephen McNeil, of course.
Cost of moose cull in Cape Breton Highlands National Park lowballed

Cost of moose cull in Cape Breton Highlands National Park lowballed

If Parks Canada is giving the Canadian public half-truths about the cost of the 2015 moose hunt, it might be time to go back through information that was provided to the  public in the past with regard to the moose hunt on North Mountain. Perhaps other discrepancies exist.