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OPINION: Quebec-bashing one of last bastions of acceptable bigotry in Canada

OPINION: Quebec-bashing one of last bastions of acceptable bigotry in Canada

Much has been made about the resignation of Andrew Potter as director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. His departure stems from a column Potter wrote in Maclean's magazine in which he used a snow removal incident in Quebec to portray Quebecers as pathetically alienated and the province's society as low-trust.
OFF SCRIPT: Maverick MLAs walk tightrope between party loyalty, conscience

OFF SCRIPT: Maverick MLAs walk tightrope between party loyalty, conscience

‘I hated losing my independence, having to vote the party line,’ recalls Francene Cosman. ‘I found that very difficult because I’m very much an independent thinker. So, that was the toughest role for me, was learning to toe the party line.’
GRANT FROST: Are sanitized report cards still relevant?

GRANT FROST: Are sanitized report cards still relevant?

The time and effort expended by my daughter’s teacher on crafting report cards so they follow a prescribed template might be better spent elsewhere.
OFF SCRIPT: In din of politics, constituency concerns are loudest cry

OFF SCRIPT: In din of politics, constituency concerns are loudest cry

'Usually, the thing that you want the most is to get re-elected,' former NDP finance minister Graham Steele told us. 'Your voters — you learn very quickly — your voters have no idea what is going on in the legislature. And you can work your pretty little brains out to be the best legislator ever, and the people at home don’t care.'
OFF SCRIPT: Mentors make stage fright less daunting for new MLAs

OFF SCRIPT: Mentors make stage fright less daunting for new MLAs

Secret supporters bolstered Alexa McDonough's performance during her early years as an MLA, when she was the only woman and NDP member in the House. “I’d have a note arrive — and I sometimes wouldn't even know where it has come from — saying, ‘In case you're wondering, there is no rule that prevents you from doing the following’ and I would think, 'Wow, who sent me that note?' ”
OPINION: It's time for Halifax landlords to check their bias against single mothers and families with children

OPINION: It's time for Halifax landlords to check their bias against single mothers and families with children

The landlord didn't even look at my rental application. As soon as he found out I had children, my application was rejected. My income, credit score, references — none of it mattered.
OPINION: Nova Scotia still sluggish in reacting to opioid epidemic

OPINION: Nova Scotia still sluggish in reacting to opioid epidemic

It’s March 2017 and we are just finding out Nova Scotia has recorded 60 opioid-related deaths for 2016, and four of those deaths were fentanyl-related. Do we not know which opioids were involved in the deaths of the other 93 per cent? Where are these deaths occurring? What demographics are being most affected? What contact are these individuals having with the health-care system prior to their deaths?
LENORE ZANN: One month after Bill 75, fight for education far from over

LENORE ZANN: One month after Bill 75, fight for education far from over

'Although the McNeil government used its majority to impose Bill 75 on the public school teachers of this province in the dark of night during a blizzard, something unexpected was born of that fierce February storm: the people awoke. They roused and they spoke. And it was not simply a whisper. They roared!'
OPINION: Family-doctor shortage worsens as health authority fiddles

OPINION: Family-doctor shortage worsens as health authority fiddles

An increasing number of Nova Scotians, about 100,000 now, don't have a family doctor. ... The government has accepted the bizarre premise that Nova Scotians can accept unnecessary suffering and death for a decade, perhaps two more elections, before primary care might work. Normally, people don't suffer during transition periods. Phone companies didn't cancel landline service while they implemented systems necessary for wireless communication.
COMMENTARY: In the age of convenience, antiques aren’t what they used to be

COMMENTARY: In the age of convenience, antiques aren’t what they used to be

Take my advice: Buy something ‘old’ because you like it and recognize that you shouldn’t be at all disappointed if your children or grandchildren at some point advise you they aren’t interested in inheriting many of the antiques you once believed would become valuable and treasured reminders of you.