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Opinions

OPEN LETTER: Stronger focus on physical education would be a leap forward

OPEN LETTER: Stronger focus on physical education would be a leap forward

It appears Nova Scotia's children are receiving less than half of the recommended goal (150 minutes a week) in actual school physical education. The reality is that more than 98 per cent of Nova Scotia's public elementary schoolchildren only receive 60 minutes of physical-education instruction per week. Only a few schools in the Annapolis Valley meet this goal.
PAUL SCHNEIDEREIT: Segment of Sawmill River on verge of seeing daylight

PAUL SCHNEIDEREIT: Segment of Sawmill River on verge of seeing daylight

‘This project, for a long time, people were hesitant to commit to it. ... And now we’re at a place where the pieces all seem to be falling together,’ says Larissa Holman of the Ecology Action Centre.
ANNA SHOUB: Nova Scotia focused on fleecing artists, not embracing them

ANNA SHOUB: Nova Scotia focused on fleecing artists, not embracing them

If Maud Lewis were alive today, she would be charged commercial property taxes. Nice paintings, Maud, but that's a business you are running from your house. What's that you say? You only make $10 per painting? So sorry, that's the way our tax legislation is written. Our hands are tied.
COMMENTARY: Heed The Fish Doctor, who once netted much publicity for Nova Scotia

COMMENTARY: Heed The Fish Doctor, who once netted much publicity for Nova Scotia

I am sure it will help you better understand why C.M. (Bud) Harlow became so obsessed with health and fitness when you learn that, as a pathologist, he had performed more than 3,000 autopsies, often on people who had eaten lousy food, hadn’t exercised and had taken up very bad habits during the course of their lives. This had exposed him, in dramatic fashion, to the terrible effects all of this has on human bodies.
OFF SCRIPT: In Nova Scotia, roads rule while other issues fail to get traction

OFF SCRIPT: In Nova Scotia, roads rule while other issues fail to get traction

If someone with no knowledge of Nova Scotia politics were to listen to the more than 75 hours of recorded interviews we have conducted with former MLAs, you might have to excuse them for assuming roads are the most important public policy issue facing Nova Scotia today.
OFF SCRIPT: Political teamwork translates into speaking up privately

OFF SCRIPT: Political teamwork translates into speaking up privately

'Some of the issues you deal with are tough,' says former premier Rodney MacDonald. 'But you are part of the team and you ran as part of that team, and you have to be willing to make the tough decisions as part of the team. And, like I said, if you’re not willing to do it, then you need to step aside.'
COMMENTARY: Artificial intelligence will transform agriculture, from growing to grocery store

COMMENTARY: Artificial intelligence will transform agriculture, from growing to grocery store

Using AI, farmers can improve yield and efficiency. And grocers can understand consumers — and predict their behaviour — better than consumers know themselves.
GRANT FROST: McNeil’s new-found Midas touch might be fool’s gold

GRANT FROST: McNeil’s new-found Midas touch might be fool’s gold

Back in November, when teachers wanted to put class caps on the negotiating table, the Liberals quite publicly declared the associated cost would be prohibitive, placing the price tag at $41 million. How something can cost less than $20 million when asked for by the Council to Improve Classroom Conditions, but $41 million when asked for in negotiations seems to be a head-scratcher indeed.
COMMENTARY: The intention of political ads is to create tension

COMMENTARY: The intention of political ads is to create tension

“Politicians have always understood the power of tension,” says CBC Radio host Terry O’Reilly in his book. “While they campaign on the issues they stand for, they also make hay from what they stand against, especially in rousing speeches and heated debates.”
OPINION: Nova Scotia well positioned to harness bio-economy potential

OPINION: Nova Scotia well positioned to harness bio-economy potential

The market for products such as biofuel and biochemicals derived from renewable resources is projected to expand with upwards of 15 per cent annual growth over the next five years. This brings a significant opportunity for regions like Nova Scotia, where we have access to vast renewable resources from our farming, fishing and forest sectors.